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One more Lso-positive psyllid found in Idaho

Potato     
August 29, 2014 by Erik Wenninger

Potato psyllid captures in our monitoring program slightly increased last week and remained at similar levels this week. Most psyllids during the last two weeks were found in the Treasure Valley (Canyon, Payette, Owyhee Counties) or Elmore County.

In addition, one of the psyllids collected in Owyhee County last week tested positive for Lso (liberibacter; the bacterium that causes zebra chip). This is only the second psyllid that has tested positive so far in the commercial fields we have been monitoring.

We typically observe an increase in psyllid captures at the end of the growing season; however, it is likely that the heavy rains we have experienced recently have affected psyllid numbers. It is important to consider management options for psyllids and zebra chip in order to keep the crop protected until harvest.

Detailed results for the “intense” fields, which are monitored with 10 sticky traps, vacuum samples, and leaf samples are here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdG15WTNRMkEteHRWRGhpM2ltSXBiR3c#gid=0

Detailed results for the “light” fields, which are monitored with 4 sticky traps are here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdGVrX2t2NGs0YzlYYUZaQkNaejhES2c#gid=0

More information and resources on potato psyllids and zebra chip, including management and scouting recommendations, can be found at the link below.

http://extension.uidaho.edu/kimberly/tag/potato-psyllid-and-zebra-chip/

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ISDA Pesticide Disposal Program

     
August 27, 2014 by Jeff Miller

The Idaho State Department of Agriculture will be conducting its Fall Pesticide Disposal program again this fall. Specific information on places and times is available at the attached link.

Click on the link(s) below for more information about this pest:

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Cercospora leaf spot in sugarbeets

Sugarbeets     Magic Valley - Idaho
August 27, 2014 by Jeff Miller

Cercospora leaf spot has been confirmed in a sugarbeet field in Minidoka County. The recent wet weather has been favorable for disease development. The link below directs to an extension bulletin published by the University of Nebraska which discusses disease symptoms and fungicides which can be used for disease management.

Click on the link(s) below for more information about this pest:

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Potato Late Blight Continues to Spread

Potato     
August 22, 2014 by Phil Nolte


Two fields with late blight in Fremont County were confirmed today. There are multiple late blight fields in Madison, Bingham, Bonneville and Power Counties. The current recommendation is if anyone in the affected counties has not applied a protectant fungicide to their potato fields do so immediately. Until vine kill the University of Idaho recommends that potato fields be kept on a 7 day spray schedule. Rain is predicted to continue in all of the current late blight infected counties and rain is very efficient at moving late blight spore around. .

It is essential to protect green, growing vines with fungicide applications. Spores of the late blight pathogen are washed from the foliage into the soil causing tubers to become infected. Sometimes tuber infection can occur with very little foliar late blight. Protecting the foliage of Ranger Russet fields is particularly important because the vines remain green longer and the tubers are highly susceptible to tuber infection.

If late blight is present in your field, we recommend a post-harvest application of a phosphorous acid (phosphite) product going into storage at the rate of 12.8 fl oz/ton applied at a volume of 0.5 gal/ton of potatoes. Ensure you are not over-applying which may add too much water to the harvested potatoes. Potatoes should NOT be shiny wet, but rather barely damp. Apply at a point in the handling process where potatoes are rotating or dropping to ensure the best coverage. These post-harvest products will not cure infected tubers but will protect healthy tubers form becoming infected in storage.

Please bring any suspicious samples in to the University of Idaho or Miller Research for positive identification.

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Idaho Psyllid Monitoring Update

Potato     
August 22, 2014 by Erik Wenninger

Potato psyllid captures in our monitoring program slightly increased this week in terms of numbers (but remain relatively low compared to previous monitoring years) and locations (Magic and Treasure Valleys). Psyllids were found on sticky traps in commercial potato fields in Owyhee, Canyon, Ada, Elmore, and Twin Falls Counties.
None of the psyllids found so far in commercial fields (except for one on Canyon County during mid-July) has tested positive for Lso (liberibacter; the bacterium that causes zebra chip).


Detailed results for the “intense” fields, which are monitored with 10 sticky traps, vacuum samples, and leaf samples are here:


https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdG15WTNRMkEteHRWRGhpM2ltSXBiR3c#gid=0


Detailed results for the “light” fields, which are monitored with 4 sticky traps are here:


https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdGVrX2t2NGs0YzlYYUZaQkNaejhES2c#gid=0



More information and resources on potato psyllids and zebra chip, including management and scouting recommendations, can be found at the link below.



http://extension.uidaho.edu/kimberly/tag/potato-psyllid-and-zebra-chip/

More information...
 
 

Late blight in Idaho

Potato     
August 20, 2014 by Phil Nolte

An additional potato field in Madison County has been confirmed with late blight.

Previously, late blight had been confirmed in Power County, Bonneville County, and Bingham County. The current recommendation from the University of Idaho is for everyone to apply a protectant fungicide immediately. The rain showers we have been experiencing lately provide perfect conditions for late blight to spread. Please remember that late blight also has the ability to infect tubers growing in the ground as spores move from the plants into the soil. Stay on a 7 day spray schedule and continue to scout fields carefully. Please bring any suspicious samples in to the University of Idaho or Miller Research for positive identification.

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Sprout damage in grain

     
August 19, 2014 by Juliet Marshall

Guidance to Idaho malting barley producers experiencing higher than acceptable sprout damage in their 2014 malting barley crop

Growers are urged to be patient and not panic as they try to complete their 2014 growing season. We recommend producers follow these steps:
1. Follow best management harvesting practices, particularly avoid harvesting lodged barley. Beware that injured by sprout barley is more fragile and more susceptible to skinned and broken kernels.
2. Quickly harvest the remaining grain to prevent growth of molds. Sooty molds will increase off flavors in malt and reduce suitability for feed.
3. Store your barley with good aeration. Grain is stored best if it is cool, dry and clean. The recommended maximum moisture content for storage of clean sound barley during warm summer temperatures is 12%. Barley can be stored at slightly higher moisture content if it is kept cool.
4. Take a good bin sample as your put your barley into storage and work with your malting barley company to have the barley tested for injured by sprout.
5. Be patient and give your malting company time to determine what portion of your crop can be used as malting.
6. Try to avoid dumping your barley as feed at harvest as the commercial feed barley prices have been dropping rapidly.
Your malting companies are going to extraordinary lengths to test Idaho malting barley that has been injured by sprout and to determine how much can be used for malting. They are researching and micro malting samples to determine the highest limit of sprout damage they can take without compromising the malting and brewing process.

It is important to understand why sprout damage poses a risk in the brewing process. Pre-harvest sprouting (PHS) or pre-germination impacts the ability of barley to germinate. Problems can range from a slow loss of germinative energy or capacity over time in storage to the complete loss of germination at the time of harvest. Barley used for malting must exhibit vigorous and uniform germination. In malting, pre-harvest sprouted barley can lead to poorly modified malt that is unsuitable for the production of beer. Low extract yields, poor beer stability and off-flavors are just a few of the problems that can result from PHS damaged barley.

Barley kernels remain resistant to sprouting prior to physiological maturity. Some varieties maintain a level of resistance (dormancy) for a significant time after harvest. Certain conditions like heavy rainfall at maturity can reduce this level of resistance to germination.

The bottom line is that barley with sprout damage, even if it germinates well after harvest, can lose germination rapidly in storage. There are no tests that can predict when a sudden drop in germination will occur. Even if a relatively high degree of germination remains in a lot of barley, the germination may be uneven with some kernels germinating much slower than others in that lot resulting in a malt that does not meet brewers minimum specifications for beer production.

Full documents at: http://www.uidaho.edu/extension/cereals/scseidaho

For more information, please contact Kelly Olson, Idaho Barley Commission Boise office 208-334-2090, cell 208-409-9165 or our Idaho Falls satellite office, cell 208-569-6957. Dr. Juliet Marshall, University of Idaho, Idaho Falls, 208-529-8376, cell 208-390-4859.

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What is the Pacific Northwest Pest Alert Network?

This website utilizes a network of growers around the Pacific Northwest. As information about pest infestations becomes available, registered users will receive updates pertaining to the specific crops that they may be growing at the time.