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Spider Mites in sugar beets

Sugarbeets     Treasure Valley - All
July 31, 2014 by Bill Buhrig

Two-spotted spider mites are being found in sugar beet fields in the Treasure Valley. Implementing proper scouting procedures and working with your crop consultant should be done to determine if action is necessary. For more information on the two-spotted spider mite, consult the PNW Insect Handbook at the link below.

On a related note, there has been a Section 18 granted for specific counties in Idaho and Oregon for the use of the miticide Onager in sugar beets. This is a very specific label that includes expiration dates in the coming weeks. For the eligible counties in Oregon, this label expires August 14, 2014. For eligible counties Idaho, this label expires August 31, 2014.

As is the case with all pesticides, please read and follow the label carefully!

Click on the link(s) below for more information about this pest:

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Mites in field corn

Corn     Treasure Valley - All
July 31, 2014 by Bill Buhrig

Local crop consultants are seeing an increased number of mites in cornfields in the Treasure Valley. Mite populations can flare quickly so it is important to scout fields. Work with your crop consultant to help determine threshold numbers and develop a treatment plan if necessary. Please refer to the link below for information on available treatment products from the PNW Insect Management Handbook.

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corn earworm

Corn     Treasure Valley - All
Canyon county, Idaho
July 29, 2014 by Jerry Neufeld

I am collaborating with Charter Seed Co. and Crookham Seed Co. on a project to trap corn earworm moths. We set out 7 traps in corn fields at various locations from near Melba to near Wilder. I am checking the traps every few days and posting the moth counts to this website. Below are the moth counts from this week. Once again, I did not find any adult corn earworm moths in the traps.

There are a couple of models that can be used to predict the emergence of the summer generation of corn earworm moths. This is the generation that lays eggs in corn that is silking at the time of their emergence.

One model uses January 1 as a biofix, 55 and 95 as the temperature parameters and predicts the summer moths will appear after 1300 growing degree days (GDD) and begin laying eggs in fresh corn silk. This model also estimates the eggs will hatch and larvae will begin feeding on corn ears 73 GDD later. According to this model, we reached 1300 GDD in the Parma area on 7/21 and 1300 GDD in the Caldwell area on 7/25, yet I have not found any adult moths. We will reach 1300 GDD in the Nampa area today.

The second model simply uses 8/1 as the default date; the date the summer moths will emerge and begin laying eggs in fresh corn silk.

Since I have not found any adult moths yet there could be several things going on. 1) The traps and lures are not working. I used these traps with CEW pheromones lures a few years ago and they worked just fine. 2) There aren’t any corn earworm moths this year. It could happen, but this is rather unlikely. 3) The model using January 1 as a biofix isn’t quite right for our area. My suspicion is that the model using January 1 as a biofix is not quite accurate for our area and we will soon see the summer generation of moths appear. I have talked to some industry people and like me, they have not yet seen the summer generation of CEW moths. Stay tuned, I will check the traps next week and let you know what I find out.


Weekly Corn Earwom Counts, 2014
Date

Location 7/23 7/29

caldwell area 0 0
melba area 0 0
north of lake lowell 0 0
west of greenleaf 0 0
east of wilder 0 0
west of wilder 0 0
north of homedale 0 0

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Miller Research Potato Pest Management Field Day

Potato     
July 29, 2014 by Jeff Miller

Miller Research will be holding its annual Potato Pest Management Field Day on Thursday, August 14 from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm. The attached flier provides specific details. Topics will include foliar disease management (early blight, white mold, gray mold), the use of Vydate as an alternative to metam sodium, and an update on potato psyllids/ZC in our area. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost to attend, but please RSVP so that we can plan appropriately. Please respond to Jeff Miller at either jeff@millerresearch.com or (208) 531-5124.

We have received 3 CCA (Integrated Pest Management) credits and have requested 3 ISDA credits.

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Last Cereals Field Day for Cereals 2014 Season

Small Grains     Eastern Idaho
Ada county, Idaho
July 29, 2014 by Juliet Marshall

At 10 AM on Thursday morning, please join us for the last Cereals Field Day of the season!
The location: Marotz Farm 1475 N 400 E, Ashton, ID

TEN AM!! LUNCH PROVIDED!

Contacts: Lance Ellis (208) 624-3102
Juliet Marshall (208) 529-8376

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potato psyllid update

Potato     
July 25, 2014 by Erik Wenninger

Psyllid numbers captured in our monitoring program this week were similar to the numbers captured last week; however, we found for the first time this year potato psyllids on sticky traps in potato fields in the following counties: Owyhee, Gooding, Cassia, and Power. As reported earlier this week, one potato psyllid collected last week (Canyon County) tested positive for liberibacter (Lso), the bacterium that causes zebra chip disease. No other psyllids tested so far this year have been positive.

Potato psyllids are beginning to appear in more counties, including those that are further east in our monitoring network. Local monitoring and management programs should be in place in these areas.

Results for the “intense” fields, which are monitored with 10 sticky traps, vacuum samples, and leaf samples are here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdG15WTNRMkEteHRWRGhpM2ltSXBiR3c#gid=0

Results for the “light” fields, which are monitored with 4 sticky traps are here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdGVrX2t2NGs0YzlYYUZaQkNaejhES2c#gid=0

More information and resources on potato psyllids and zebra chip, including management and scouting recommendations, can be found at the link below.

http://extension.uidaho.edu/kimberly/tag/potato-psyllid-and-zebra-chip/

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First Lso-positive potato psyllid in Idaho during 2014

Potato     
July 23, 2014 by Erik Wenninger

We have confirmed within our monitoring network our first liberibacter-positive potato psyllid in Idaho. The psyllid was collected last week from a yellow sticky card in a potato field in Canyon County. Liberibacter (Lso) is the bacterium that causes zebra chip disease. This positive psyllid and other data from the monitoring program will be incorporated before the end of the week into the online spreadsheets available at the links below. Now is the time to step up local monitoring and management programs in the area.

Results for the “intense” fields, which are monitored with 10 sticky traps, vacuum samples, and leaf samples are here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdG15WTNRMkEteHRWRGhpM2ltSXBiR3c#gid=0

Results for the “light” fields, which are monitored with 4 sticky traps are here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdGVrX2t2NGs0YzlYYUZaQkNaejhES2c#gid=0

More information and resources on potato psyllids and zebra chip, including management and scouting recommendations, can be found at the link below.

http://extension.uidaho.edu/kimberly/tag/potato-psyllid-and-zebra-chip/

More information...
 
 

corn earworm

Corn     Treasure Valley - All
Canyon county, Idaho
July 23, 2014 by Jerry Neufeld

I am collaborating with Charter Seed Co. and Crookham Seed Co. on a project to trap corn earworm moths. We set out 7 traps in corn fields at various locations from near Melba to near Wilder. I am checking the traps every few days and posting the moth counts to this website.

Below are the moth counts from this week.
Location 7/23

caldwell area 0
melba area 0
north of lake lowell 0
west of greenleaf 0
east of wilder 0
west of wilder 0
north of homedale 0

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corn earworm

     Treasure Valley - All
Canyon county, Idaho
July 21, 2014 by Jerry Neufeld

The University of Idaho CIS 366 entitled “Timing Corn Earworm Control,” states that summer CEW moths will begin laying eggs in fresh corn silk at approximately 1300 growing degree days (GDD). Egg hatch and larvae attack will begin about 73 GDD later.

According to the Oregon State University GDD model for Corn Earworm (http://uspest.org/cgi-bin/ddmodel.pl?clm), we are currently at 1219 GDD in the Caldwell area and 1327 in the Parma area. We will hit 1300 GDD in the Caldwell area on approximately 7/25. Those fields with fresh silk at approximately 1373 GDD are most vulnerable to attack from corn earworm larvae. We will hit 1373 in the Caldwell area about 7/25 and 1373 in the Parma area about 7/23.

The following information was taken from CIS 366 regarding corn earworm.

Corn can be “scouted” for corn earworm eggs to predict possible infestation levels. Examine 10 silk masses (about 2-day old) on each edge of a field but only in those fields which are beginning to silk or are silking. Examining a field in late silk for the first time is worthless; most of the eggs, if any were present, are already hatched, and the damage cannot be prevented.

When the egg counts average 1 egg per 2 silk masses, about 100% ear infestation will occur in the field and other fields of like maturity in the vicinity. With 1 egg per 2 silk masses, about 1 inch of each ear tip will be damaged; 1 egg per silk mass will result in about 2 inches of the ear tip damage, etc. When the days and nights are warmer than usual, the damage may double because the earworm will develop faster than the corn.

Fields should be scouted about every 2 to 4 days, depending on temperatures. Once economic egg levels are reached, determined on the basis of damage expected, further scouting is unnecessary. All fields which silk after that time in that vicinity will be subject to damage.

No chemical control will control worms in the ears, so sprays must be timed to control the larvae on the silk before the worms enter the ears. Make the first application when the plants are 50 percent silk, and repeat in 5 to 7 days or as necessary.

I am once again collaborating with Charter Seed Company and Crookham Company on a project to trap corn earworm moths at several locations in the Treasure Valley. We set out 7 traps at various locations from near Melba to near Wilder. I will check the traps every few days and post the moth counts to this website. Purdue University recommends a treatment threshold of 10 moths per trap per night.

For CEW control information from the 2014 Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook click on the links below for the type of corn you are growing.

Click on the link(s) below for more information about this pest:

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potato psyllid and ZC update

Potato     
July 18, 2014 by Erik Wenninger

We have observed a notable increase in the number of psyllids captured in our monitoring program this week relative to previous weeks this year (though still much lower than toward the end of the last two seasons). Psyllids were found on sticky traps in two potato fields in Canyon County, two fields in Elmore County, three fields in Twin Falls County, and two fields in Jerome County. In addition, this week we found potato psyllids on sticky cards deployed near bittersweet nightshade plants at two sites in Twin Falls County. These psyllids are currently being tested or are on their way to being tested for liberibacter (Lso, the bacterium that causes zebra chip). All psyllids collected so far this year have been negative for Lso. Some sticky cards from last week were just returned to our lab early this week and were also found to have potato psyllids (one psyllid from a field in Twin Falls County and two psyllids from a field in Jerome County); these psyllids are currently being tested for Lso.

Online spreadsheets with detailed results of psyllid captures are available at the links below. These are updated periodically over the week as data come into our lab.

Results for the “intense” fields, which are monitored with 10 sticky traps, vacuum samples, and leaf samples are here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdG15WTNRMkEteHRWRGhpM2ltSXBiR3c#gid=0

Results for the “light” fields, which are monitored with 4 sticky traps are here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdGVrX2t2NGs0YzlYYUZaQkNaejhES2c#gid=0

More information and resources on potato psyllids and zebra chip, including management and scouting recommendations, can be found at the link below.

http://extension.uidaho.edu/kimberly/tag/potato-psyllid-and-zebra-chip/

More information...
 



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This website utilizes a network of growers around the Pacific Northwest. As information about pest infestations becomes available, registered users will receive updates pertaining to the specific crops that they may be growing at the time.